Domain 1: Planning and Preparation

5 Component 1e: Designing Coherent Instruction

Element

Level of Performance

Unsatisfactory

Basic

Proficient

Distinguished

Learning Activities

Learning activities are not suitable to students or instructional goals. They do not follow an organized progression and do not reflect recent professional research.

Only some of the learning activities are suitable to students or instructional goals. Progression of activities in the unit is uneven, and only some activities reflect recent professional research.

Most of the learning activities are suitable to students and instructional goals. Progression of activities in the unit it fairly even, and most activities reflect recent professional research.

Learning activities are highly relevant to students and instructional goals. They progress coherently, producing a unified whole and reflecting recent professional research.

Instructional Materials and Resources

Materials and resources do not support the instructional goals or engage students in meaningful learning.

Some of the materials and resources support the instructional goals, and some engage students in meaningful learning.

All materials and resources support the instructional goals, and most engage students in meaningful learning.

All materials and resources support the instructional goals, and most engage students in meaningful learning. There is evidence of student participation in selecting or adapting materials.

Instructional Groups

Instructional groups do not support the instructional goals and offer no variety.

Instructional groups are inconsistent in suitability to the instructional goals and offer minimal variety.

Instructional groups are varied, as appropriate to the different instructional goals.

Instructional groups are varied, as appropriate to the different instructional goals. There is evidence of student choice in selecting different patterns of instructional groups.

Lesson and Unit Structure

The lesson or unit has no clearly defined structure, or the structure is chaotic. Time allocations are unrealistic.

The lesson or unit has a recognizable structure, although the structure is not uniformly maintained throughout. Most time allocations are reasonable.

The lesson or unit has a clearly defined structure that activities are organized around. Time allocations are reasonable.

The lessonís or unitís structure is clear and allows for different pathways according to student needs.

 

This lesson is a review of basic units of measurement in the English

>> and Metric Systems for Standards of Learning (SOL) Preparations in

>> the areas of Math and Physical Science, grades 6-8.

>>  

>> Learning Activities

>> The teacher has posted a list of current SOL objectives to be

>> accomplished, and guidelines for completion are included. A web page

>> including a syllabus and timetables with links to various VA DOE

>> (Dept. of Education) SOL content sites has also been launched. Each

>> student has a conversion chart for English and Metric units of

>> measure in an organized notebook, and the teacherís course syllabus

>> lists lessons and follow-up activities that augment the specific SOL

>> (s). The lesson I observed was a detailed analysis of a one-inch

>> segment on a ruler with a subsequent accompanying handout that

>> detailed pertinent facts related to measuring by 1/16ths divisions.

>>

>> The lesson included an activity where the students freehand

>> constructed an enlarged and oversized segment of one inch showing the

>> 16 parts, and 4 divisions (1/16ths, 1/8ths, 1/4ths, and 1/2) on a

>> lined piece of paper by stretching the drawing between the two red

>> margin lines. The action of physically dividing the paper into the

>> various sections emphasized critical thinking and problem solving

>> methodological applications and many students immediately understood

>> the graphic representation of the different divisions on a real ruler

>> before any actual numbers were written.

>>

>> Metric units were orally reviewed from the studentís conversion

>> tables and additional data and examples were included and discussed

>> such as Metric Congressional Acts of 1976, use of metrics in

>> construction, automobile tools and standards, trading and shipping

>> measurement inadequacies with overseas goods and services, common

>> household items such as soft drinks

>> (qt. vs. liter), and a digital micrometer was used to show how

>> engineers must move to a more accurate decimal system when

>> measurements are smaller than 1/128th of an inch.

>>  

>> Instructional Materials and Resources

>> The instructor provided many tools and examples to augment the

>> lesson. Subsequent lessons and activities involved the construction

>> of a container and bridges using paper models following English units

>> were planned; 8mm square by 915mm length balsawood strips were also

>> planned to be used to construct metric towers 75 cubic millimeters A

>> metric dragster following 42 specifications for construction was also

>> discussed and listed in the course syllabus /timelines. Links to

>> various websites such as www.science-of-speed ,

>> www.eplans.com , and www.enchantedlearning.com for various classroom

>> activities were explored. A multi-media approach was used to engage

>> the students in meaningful learning activities.

>>

>> Finally, the students roll-played a problem of measurement where they

>> were in charge of Shipping and Distribution for a mail order company

>> and 1000 people ordered 5 common teaching items

>> (crayons, pencils, rulers, notepads, and staples) and they had to

>> minimize costs by selecting an appropriate container sized to fit

>> these items.

>>  

>> Instructional Groups

>> The instructor had previously taught a unit on personality types,

>> group dynamics, and left / right brained thinking. Discussions

>> revealed plans to use various mixes of students in the activities.

>> including some mildly competitive stimulated mixes by gender.

>> Beginning activities would pair "A", "B", and "C" type

>> personalities, incorporating debriefings and reflections related to

>> future employment and personal relationships at home with siblings

>> and a better understanding of some of the dynamics of their parentís

>> professions.

>>

>>

>> Lesson and Unit Structure

>> The instructorís lesson, and subsequent lessons were highly

>> structured, organized, and well planned. Distinct units of time for

>> activities were listed on the course syllabus and they followed the

>> suggested sequence recommended by departmental objectives and DOE

>> directives.

>> Plans included lessons, lectures, and additional teaching

>> methodologies that allowed for review, provided excellent

>> opportunities for academic success, and incorporated allowances for

>> individual learning styles and IEP accommodations.

>> Clear and concise rubrics, and opportunities for student and parent

>> contact for questions, make-up, additional explanations, and possible

>> grade alternatives were noted in both written and web-based formats.

>> An analogy comparing U.S currency denominations to English units of

>> measurements was very effective as well.